Dispute Resolution, in Person, for Real

So, I’m excited!

Along with 13 other members of the ADR Research Network, we have been meeting in the glorious sunshine at Queensland University of Technology’s Garden Point Campus this week. Meeting for real, in person. With coffee in hand and fuelled by victuals kindly provided by QUT law school, we have be discussing the most difficult aspects of dispute resolution theory and practice.

The ADR Research Network was founded in 2012 by a group of dispute resolution academics from across Australia. We live and work in the far corners of this big country, from Hobart to Townsville, from the Gold Coast to Bundoora. Some of us are mediators, some lawyers, some legal philosophers, educators and we all live and breathe dispute resolution. We had all met at conferences before and read each others’ work over the years and a few of us have even written together. But we wanted to do more than just see each other occasionally and referee each others’ work: we wanted to engage with each other on what we are working on, we wanted to debate the hard stuff, we wanted to share a laugh.

As well as running this blog, we have decided to write a book together, based around the theme of changing professional identities for both lawyers and mediators in dispute resolution. The increased use of ADR and institutionalisation of processes such as mediation challenge us to rethink the role of lawyers and mediators in dispute resolution. Questions arise such as is mediation now a profession? Is there a single mediation community or are there multiple communities of mediation practice? How do we train lawyers to achieve justice in mediation? What is the basis of an ethical decision making process for mediators? How best do we define mediation and is that important? Should neuroscience affect mediator practice?

The most exciting thing about our book project is that it is so collaborative in nature. Each chapter will be written by a single author but with extensive feedback from the group as a whole and from individual authors. This will create a highly reflective and tightly structured collection that we hope will be central to understanding contemporary dispute resolution practice.

We are still writing and putting together a book proposal. To give you a sense of what we are all writing about, here’s a way to see the tweets we have made over the past few days at the workshop. We have been using the hashtag #adrresearchnetwork. These tweets summarise the ideas raised by each author in our chapters and some of our thoughts around the table as a group.

Stay tuned …

National Mediation Conference 2014

The 14th National Mediation Conference will be held from Tuesday 9 – Thursday 11 September 2014. Chosen from delegates’ feedback, the selected theme for 2014 is “Pathways to Resolution: the Challenge of Diversity”.

The conference website has just been launched and can be found here.

Conference Co-conveners Tania Sourdin and Walter Ibbs explain what the conference is and how it works

The Conference will bring together diverse practitioners, policy makers, researchers, managers, judges and leaders in the field of mediation, negotiation and dispute resolution to explore the diversity of experience, conflict, intellectual outlook, cognitive style, cultural competence and many other attributes that contribute to the richness of the resolution environment.

This Melbourne NMC is especially exciting for those of us who do research in the field of dispute resolution, as for the first time the National Mediation Conference will be combined with the Research Forum of the National Alternative Dispute Resolution Advisory Council (NADRAC). The two great dispute resolution research events in Australia will now be combined. It is going to be a dispute resolution ideas fest and we should all expect to walk away mind-boggled and tongue-tied. Sourdin and Ibbs write ‘This addition will provide delegates with the opportunity to meet and engage on the latest trends and issues in ADR research.’ The 2 day Research forum will start on the last day of the NMC and will continue the next day also.

Since the demise of NADRAC, it is not clear what the status of the research forum will be. But there are many working hard behind the scenes to ensure that it goes ahead regardless. 

The call for papers is now open and abstracts can be submitted from now until 21 February 2014 here.

The theme of the conference is ‘Diversity’.

 The Conference Organisers are particularly interested in presentations that support this theme. The concurrent sessions will be grouped into the following general streams and presenters should nominate to which stream their presentation or poster will relate.

 The streams are:

  • Family;
  • Business & Workplace;
  • Court & Tribunals;
  • Community Mediation;
  • System Design, Public and Statutory ADR;
  • Online dispute resolution/New technologies;
  • Training & Standards;
  • International Approaches;
  • Mediation Practice (including blended, cultural & inclusive ADR practice); and
  • NADRAC ADR Conference stream.

 

 

 

New ADR academic opportunity

Just seen in the inbox, an invitation to submit and article and attend a scholarship round-table at Washington University Negotiation & Dispute Resolution Program 

 

Dear friends –

 

Washington University Negotiation & Dispute Resolution Program will host a scholarship roundtable Friday, November 15, 2013, focused on “New Directions in Global Negotiation & Dispute Resolution,” in conjunction with the Whitney R. Harris World Law Institute.   Papers will be published in the spring volume of the Washington University Journal of Law & Policy. There are openings for 2-3 additional articles.   If you have an article in progress in this area, please submit an abstract for publication consideration of at least one page (or more) by September 1, 2013.   

 

The Negotiation & Dispute Resolution Program hosts biannual “New Directions” roundtables that bring together academics and practitioners at the forefront of negotiation and dispute resolution scholarship, teaching, and practice, with the goal of generating cutting-edge scholarship in the field.   Articles published in the “New Directions” series in the past three years are listed below and can be accessed on line at: http://law.wustl.edu/journal/pages.aspx?ID=703    Frequently, the articles have drawn on the intersection of clinical and dispute resolution theory and practice.

 

Whether you are publishing in the upcoming volume or not, we welcome you to participate. We hope you will join us!

 

Best,

Karen

 

Karen Tokarz

Charles Nagel Professor of Public Interest Law & Public Service

Director, Negotiation & Dispute Resolution Program

Washington University School of Law

One Brookings Drive, Campus Box 1120

St. Louis, MO  63130  USA

Office: 314.935.6414, Cell: 314.422.0354

law.wustl.edu/faculty_profiles/profiles.aspx?id=448