Call for Abstracts: Monash Courts and Tribunals Research Roundtable

The Australian Centre for Justice Innovation at Monash University is pleased to host the Monash Courts and Tribunal Research Roundtable on 18 September. The Roundtable will focus on empirical civil justice research on courts and tribunals, and will be held at Monash University Law Chambers in the Melbourne CBD.

Topics of interest may include (but are not limited to):

  • examining civil justice activity in courts and tribunals
  • evaluating law reforms or innovations in case management, and
  • research methods, techniques and challenges in court and tribunal settings.

The roundtable will be an opportunity for researchers and policy makers in this field to share insights, practices and findings in connection with empirical civil justice research in court and tribunal settings. Works in progress are appropriate.  Early career and PhD researchers are particularly welcome, and bursaries to fund attendance will be offered to up to three early-career or PhD participants.

Abstract submission

Please send the title of your presentation and a short abstract (up to 250 words) by 21 July to ellen.hays@monash.edu.

You can view the PDF version of the Call for Abstracts here.

 

Responding to the litigant in person challenge: Where to from here?

Additionally, ACJI has an interesting event relating to civil justice which ADR Research Network blog subscribers in Melbourne may be interested in … 
Presented by Dr Bridgette Toy-Cronin and Justice Kevin Bell AM

The Australian Centre for Justice Innovation is delighted to host a public lecture about future directions for policy and practice regarding self-represented litigants.

The rise of self-represented litigants has been recognised as a phenomenon across the common law world. The last decade has seen increasing attention given to the issue by policy makers, researchers, lawyers and the judiciary. This discussion will consider the evidence base and responses developed to date and ask, “where should we go from here”? This question will be considered in terms of future directions for research, policy, and practice, with particular reference to Justice Bell’s decision in Matsoukatidou v Yarra Ranges Council [2017] VSC 61.

Date: Tuesday 19 September 2017
Time: 5:30-7pm
Venue: Monash Law Chambers,
555 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne

Registrations for this event will open in August.

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS:  GLOBAL POUND CONFERENCE SERIES 

This post concerns a call for proposals to translate and/or analyse data that has been collected during the Global Pound Conference Series and/or produce a final report. Publication from any of the work performed under this request for proposals would be subject to pre-approval by the GPC Central Organising Group and the final report would also be subject to review by the GPC Series Academic Committee. If you are interested in expressing interest in undertaking some of this work, details of process and timelines are contained in the post.

This post has been contributed by network member Dalma Demeter. We have mentioned the Global Pound Conference Series before in Roscoe Pound would be proud – Reflections on the history of the Global Pound Conference, Global Pound Conference Sydney, and Researcher Profile: Meet the team from Resolution Resources. Some GPC Series data has been made available by IMI with guidelines for use by researchers on the GPC Series Website.

Dr. Dalma R Demeter LL.M., SJD, GCTE
Faculty of Business, Government & Law
School of Law & Justice
University of Canberra

imi logoIntroduction

Initiated by the International Mediation Institute (a not-for-profit organisation), the Global Pound Conference (GPC) Series 2016-17 will facilitate the development of 21st century commercial dispute resolution tools at domestic, regional and international levels.

Launched in Singapore and finishing in London in 2017, the GPC Series is a not-for-profit global project that convenes all stakeholders in dispute resolution – commercial parties, chambers of commerce, lawyers, academics, judges, arbitrators, mediators, policy makers, government officials, and others – at conferences around the world. Currently scheduled to take place in 40 cities across 31 countries, these conferences provoke debate on existing tools and techniques, stimulate new ideas and generate data on what corporate and individual dispute resolution users actually need and want, both locally and globally.

To date Approximately 1,700 people participated in Global Pound Conference (GPC) events between March 2016 – June 2017. The aggregated data from the first seven events that have taken place already show some interesting themes and trends and provide interesting food for thought and some ideas regarding how to possibly shape the future of commercial dispute resolution and improve access to justice in commercial disputes globally.

Stakeholder groups

Results are collected from 5 stakeholder groups:

Parties: Users (businesses) who are involved in disputes and use commercial dispute resolution services (e.g., business managers or in-house counsel involved in litigation, arbitration, mediation or mixed mode processes);

Advisors: External advisors who assist Parties in managing their disputes (e.g., external lawyers, experts, forensic accountants);

Adjudicative Providers: These comprise judges, arbitrators and organizations providing adjudication services;

Non-Adjudicative Providers: Conciliators, mediators, ombudsmen and organizations providing such services; and

Influencers: E.g., academics, government officials, educators, policy advisors, etc. who do not participate in commercial disputes but are influential in the dispute resolution market.

Data

Data collected consist of both ‘live’ data that are generated immediately during each GPC event (in response to 20 Core Questions, using the PowerVote electronic voting system) and qualitative data in the form of participant responses to a series of ‘open’ questions, delegate information, word clouds and written questions and answers, also collected during each event.

Scope of project and call for assistance

The final outcome of the GPC Series will be a final report based on a statistically robust analysis of the data collected that:

a. identifies key trends in commercial dispute resolution practice globally;
b. contains a cross-jurisdictional comparison of dispute resolution practices;
c. compares needs and perceptions across stakeholder groups;
d. makes recommendations about how access to justice in commercial disputes can be improved both globally and within jurisdictions.

The GPC Series requires assistance from interested parties to undertake one or more of the following aspects of the overall GPC research assignment:

1. Translation of qualitative responses from some events to English (Arabic, Spanish, Italian, French, Polish, German, Dutch, Russian, Thai, Portuguese).
2. Coding and analysing voting data.
3. Pattern analysis of qualitative data.
4. Producing a final report containing the elements referred to in a)-d) above.

The final report will be subject to review by the Academic Committee of the GPC Series.

The data collected from the various GPC Series events provide a rich source of qualitative and quantitative data for future research, which might focus on country, regional, jurisdictional or global trends identified in the course of the Series. It provides a unique opportunity to be involved in shaping the future of dispute resolution globally.

Researchers involved in the GPC research assignment may also have the opportunity to submit their authored work to a variety of publication outlets, subject to approval of the GPC Central Organising Group.

Timeframes

The following deadlines apply:

a. Expressing interest: 31 July 2017
b. Translation of qualitative data: 31 October 2017
c. Data analysis completion: 31 December 2017
d. Final report: 31 January 2018

Proposals

If you are interested in participating in the GPC research assignment, please send an email to the Academic Committee of the GPC Series (details below) indicating:

a. Details of your organisation, the individuals whom you propose to involve and their level of appropriate experience.
b. Which of the items 1 – 4 of the research assignment listed above you are interested in undertaking (preference will be given to tenders willing to handle all 4).
c. The extent of your or your institution’s ability to absorb costs involved in the aspect of research in which you are involved (at this stage the GPC does not have a budget available for these items).
d. Fee or cost estimates you may anticipate for completing this project by January 31, 2018.
e. A brief plan setting out how you intend to execute the items you have shown an interest in, including a time frame for each item.
f. Any other information you think would be helpful for the Academic Committee to know.

Please contact barney.jordaan@vlerick.com Barney Jordaan, Chair: Academic Committee of the GPC Series

 

What’s a Heat Exchanger got to do with it? – Mediation re-imagined

heat

Ground heat exchangers at One Angel Square, Manchester, England
By Rept0n1x – Daytrip to Manchester (44), CC BY-SA 2.0 – Wikimedia commons

Australian law schools have a broad range of Masters programs offering subjects in the ADR space. One of the most interesting qualities of the current Masters cohort is that it is no longer a group dominated by lawyers and would-be lawyers.

Amongst other influences, the commercial imperatives pushing higher enrolments have strengthened cross-institutional and cross-disciplinary promotion of programs. The result is that today, Masters students in our law schools now come from very diverse cultural, professional and educational backgrounds. Not only are classes culturally richer for the more diverse student profile, particularly the international cohort, but the professional backgrounds are spread over a far wider field.

This means that how and what we teach needs to be re-examined as we academics rise to the challenge of dealing well with differences.

The move from homogenous to heterogeneous has brought into the ADR postgraduate space doctors, social workers, engineers, architects, journalists, accountants and social scientists, to name a few. They all have their own language and narrative and draw on different thinking and reasoning tools.These different technical and professional approaches have brought great benefits including an appetite to challenge the legally influenced, conventional language about process and concepts. We are the richer for it.

Enter the Heat Exchanger.

Last semester I had the privilege of teaching Ahsan Ashraf (whose work I draw on with his permission) in the Mediation in Commerce program at Melbourne Law School. Ahsan is an international student currently studying in Australia and working here as a construction engineer on a major infrastructure project.

He is not a lawyer but is taking some subjects available in the law school Masters program. As we investigated the mediation matrix Ahsan worked hard to join the dots. He felt the concepts were familiar but he needed to find his own reference point for them. His thinking and reasoning tools were not linear and we all recognised that if he could find a connection, this would be useful in his engagement with mediation which is itself a flexible, non-linear process.

Turning to his own discipline he finally made a connection that spoke to him. He wrote:

‘Mediation involves a very similar process to a heat exchanger; a thermodynamic equipment used in refrigeration equipment. In a heat exchanger, a hot and a cold fluid are made to flow in tubes at a controlled rate to exchange heat.[1] The level of heat exchanged between the two fluids depends upon the surface area between them. Through this engagement, the two fluids exchange heat to minimize the difference in their temperatures.

Similarly, in mediation, the two parties undergo through a facilitated negotiation process, at a preferably slow pace, to exchange their views about a dispute.[2] The process essentially is a heat exchange where the parties express their emotions, anger and anxiety.[3] This exchange of heat minimizes the differences between the positions of the parties and opens channels of communications. The whole process remains uninfluenced and parties are only facilitated to share information in a natural manner very similar to a heat exchanger resulting in a win/win situation for both parties.’

We continued to brainstorm his ideas in class and Ahsan was challenged to translate his ideas into his own version of a mediation matrix which would communicate mediation concepts to his constituency in a way that conventional mediation materials do not. And then – to add even more power to his analogy – he did what all good engineers do.

He constructed a flow chart of his mediation heat exchanger.

I reproduce it below with his permission.

flowchartIt is a great example of the kind of creativity that is valuable for teaching, practising and thinking about mediation.

Perhaps even more importantly, it is an example of cross-disciplinary thinking in the teaching and practice of ADR processes.

Ahsan’s gift to the class (and to me).

[1] Stephen Turns, Thermodynamics: Concepts and Applications (Cambridge University Press, 2006) 492.

[2] James Alfini et al, Mediation Theory and Practice (Lexis Nexis, Second Edition, 2006) 1.

[3] Ibid 33.

Asia Pacific Mediation Forum: Call for Papers

8th Asia Pacific Mediation Forum conference in Vietnam, November 2017

The 8th Asia Pacific Mediation Forum (APMF) three-day conference will be held in Da Nang, Vietnam from 11th to 13th November 2017.

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Dragon or Budha? Photo credit Syromania, Creative Commons

The conference will be convened by Thomas G. Giglione and a Conference Organising Committee in cooperation with the Asia Pacific Mediation Forum, an international organization which aims to promote effective ways to bring peace and cross-cultural understanding to the Asia Pacific region by holding bi-annual conferences in different countries in the region.

The call for papers is now open.

Topics to be covered include the approaches to and management of conflicts and disputes in courts, families, communities, workplaces, education and human resource management, e-commerce and online dispute resolution, cross-cultural dispute resolution, environmental conflicts and land disputes.

To register for this conference or to submit a proposal to present a paper, poster or workshop, please visit the conference website: https://apmf2017.mediation.vn

Early bird registration of USD$286 is available until July 31st 2017 and will then increase to USD $386.

 

About the Asia Pacific Mediation Forum

The Asia-Pacific Mediation Forum (APMF) was formed in 2001. It is a not-for-profit regional association of individuals, organizations, and institutions interested in promoting peace through mediation and other dispute resolution processes wherever conflicts threaten the well-being of individuals, organizations, communities and local, state or national governments in the region. The main objective of the APMF is to facilitate the exchange and development of knowledge, values, and skills of mediation and other dispute resolution processes, in any form, including intercultural, interpersonal, inter-institutional and international, within and between the diverse countries and cultures in the Asia-Pacific region. To fulfill this objective, conferences are held in the region every two years, with a different country taking responsibility for hosting each conference. To date, successful conferences have been held in Australia, Singapore, Fiji, Malaysia, Thailand, The Philippines and Indonesia. For more information about the APMF go to http://www.asiapacificmediationforum.org

  

Contact

8th Asia Pacific Mediation Forum

Official Conference Website: https://apmf2017.mediation.vn

Email: support@mediation.vn / thomas@mediation.vn

Global Education Academy: +84 43267 3544

Conference Hotline: +84 12655 39748

Roscoe Pound would be proud – Reflections on the history of the Global Pound Conference

The Global Pound Conference (GPC) series 2016-17 is an ambitious, future-focussed project, established to create a contemporary conversation about improving the access to and quality of justice in commercial conflicts internationally.

pound

Roscoe Pound bust by Avard Fairbanks, Nebraska Hall of Fame – Creative Commons

 

When complete, the series will have included individual conference sessions involving 29 cities in 23 countries. Several blogs on this site have talked about the GPC series and how it has played out in a number of the host cities. The significant data analysis that has already emerged from the first session in the series (and has become known as The Singapore Report) has also received commentary in these pages.

The ultimate objective is the collection of data from all conference participants using a common set of 20 multiple choice questions (The Core Questions) and four sets of open text questions (The Discussion Questions) to stimulate robust discussion, research and innovation into dispute resolution

As we approach the last of the GPC series, to be held in London in July 2017, it seems timely to go back to where it all began. History informs the present and the future and, in our excitement about the significance of this ambitious project, it is important not to overlook the contribution of the memorable life of the man whose name it bears.

Roscoe Pound (1872-64) was a remarkable man. Whilst some scholars brand him as ‘the most famous American jurisprudential thinker of the first half of the twentieth century’ and ‘the greatest twentieth century dean of the Harvard Law School’[1] his is hardly the name on every lawyer’s lips. Nor did he fit the mould of your average law school Dean.

Son of a well-known Nebraskan judge, law was not his first choice. Instead he pursued a career and doctorate in botany. Roscoepoundiana – a fungus – was named after him, ensuring his enduring botanical fame. I confess to feeling a twinge of envy!

However family pressure could not be resisted and he entered legal practice (possible in those days without a degree). Enrolling in the one year postgraduate law program at Harvard, family circumstances kept him from completing the exams but not from continuing as a practitioner.

His professional career saw him making memorable and enduring contributions wherever he went. At the Nebraska Bar he helped establish the Bar Association. He was appointed to the University of Nebraska and later became Dean of the Nebraska College of Law (1903-1907). Our students today benefit from his decision to introduce electives into the law degree.

In 1906 the American Bar Association (ABA) invited Dean Pound to deliver the keynote address at its annual meeting in St Paul, Minnesota. His speech, ‘The Causes of Popular Dissatisfaction with the Administration of Justice’, shocked many in his audience. Opening with the line ‘Dissatisfaction with the administration of justice is as old as the law….’- and continuing to chronicle the law’s deficiencies, it is not surprising that his address was not well received and the backlash from the profession provoked withdrawal of the initial decision to print and distribute 4000 copies.

However not everyone was a critic. In the audience was Dean Wigmore, Dean of Northwestern University, who soon persuaded Pound to accept a professorial post at Northwestern and later commented that Pound’s speech ‘struck the spark that kindled the white flame of high endeavour now spreading through the entire legal profession and radiating the spirit of resolute progress in the administration of justice.’[2] Discovering that Pound had not graduated in law, he gave him an honorary degree.

Pound continued his distinguished career teaching and writing, finally settling into the post of Dean of the Harvard Law School (1916-1936) – to this day he remains the only Harvard Law School Dean not to have graduated from law school.

An influential and widely published academic and administrator, by the time of his death in 1964, Pound had still not received the recognition he deserved from the practising profession to which he had contributed so greatly. Whilst not being prepared to issue an apology, the ABA did make a belated acknowledgement of Pound’s contribution to the profession and to legal thinking by awarding him the ABA medal (its highest award) in 1940.

Pound’s writing remained relevant and thought-provoking and he certainly influenced legal thinking. Those he influenced included Chief Justice Warren Burger, (another judge who managed to upset conservatives) defying his sponsor, the anti-progressive Richard Nixon, by upholding the Miranda decision and supporting the majority in Roe v. Wade.

In 1976, 70 years after Pound’s keynote address, the ABA conference returned to St Paul, Minnesota. It was here, at the appropriately named Pound Conference, that the profession finally provided Pound with what amounted to the apology and acknowledgement he so richly deserved.[3]  Joining the ABA as sponsors were the Conference of Chief Justices and the Judicial Conference of the United States. Burger clearly had considerable influence over the program as he is credited with issuing the invitation to Professor E.A. Sander, a notable Harvard academic, to participate. Dealing broadly with various issues of dissatisfaction with the legal system, Dispute Resolution was one stream among a number and many papers were delivered. However it is Sander’s paper’ ‘Varieties of Dispute Processing’[4] that has provided the conference’s most memorable legacy and continued the work begun by Pound in his 1906 address.

This first Pound conference laid the groundwork for the significant world-wide event we are celebrating now. The name is an important link to history and an acknowledgement of the man who inspired it all.

Roscoe Pound would be proud.

[1] See for example Northwestern University’s Professor Stephen Presser ‘Foreword’ in Roscoe Pound, The Ideal Element in Law (Online Library of Liberty, 1958).

[2]  N.T.H Hull, Roscoe Pound and Karl Llewellyn, Searching for an American jurisprudence (The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, 1997) 65.

[3] See ‘Perspectives on Justice in the Future’ Proceedings of the National Conference on the Causes of Popular Dissatisfaction with the Administration of Justice, West Publishing Co., St. Paul Minnesota 1979

[4] Ibid at p.65

Reminder: 6th ADR Research Network Round Table

Monday 4 December to Tuesday 5 December 2017

Hosted by the Legal Issues Centre, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand

ADR Network logo

**Call for Papers Extended until 3 July 2017**

 

Call for Paper Proposals

The Australasian Dispute Resolution Research Network is pleased to be hosting its sixth annual research round table on 4-5 December 2017. This year we are very excited to be expanding across the Tasman to New Zealand, to be hosted by the Legal Issues Centre, University of Otago, Dunedin. The round table will be held two days immediately prior to the Law and Society of Australia and New Zealand Conference at University of Otago, 6-9 December 2017.

The round tables are designed to encourage a collaborative and supportive research environment in which papers are workshopped and discussed in detail. Papers in draft form are distributed one month ahead of time to participants, to enable thoughtful and constructive quality feedback. In 2017 we will also be asking you to draft a short (1,000 words max) blog post about your paper prior to the roundtable. On the day, speakers are given up to 30 minutes for presentation, with 30 minutes for feedback and discussion. Two primary commentators will be appointed for each paper.

We welcome proposals that consider dispute resolution from a scholarly, critical and/or empirical perspective. We particularly encourage submissions from postgraduate students and early career researchers. All proposal will be considered. Papers must not have been published or submitted for publication, as the focus is work in progress.

There will be a limit to the number of papers able to be part of the round table discussions. A panel will select round table papers from abstracts submitted. The aim is to be as inclusive as time and numbers allow. The following selection criteria will be applied:

  • Papers take a scholarly, critical and/or empirical perspective on an area of dispute resolution;
  • The round table will include a spread of participants across stages of career; and
  • A well-balanced range of work will be presented at the round table to provide diversity, to develop the field and to enable cohesive discussion.

Participation is on a self-funded basis.

Attendance at the Round Table is only open to individuals who are contributing to the scholarly discussions by presenting a paper, or commentating and/or chairing a session.

Deadline for paper proposals:   Now 3 July 2017

(300 word maximum plus short bio, to adrresearchnetwork@gmail.com)

Date for notification: 31 July 2017

Draft (full) papers + blog post due: 30 October 2017 (to send to participants early Nov.)

For further information, please contact:

Conference Convenors and 2017 Network Presidents:

Sue Douglas and Becky Batagol via adrresearchnetwork@gmail.com (monitored twice weekly)

 

About the Australasian Dispute Resolution Research Network

The Australasian Dispute Resolution Research Network brings together leading dispute resolution scholars and provides a collaborative environment to foster, nurture and enrich high quality research and scholarship. The Network is inclusive and forward-looking and seeks to bring together emerging, mid-career and established scholars to build excellence in the field and provide peer support. Network activities are expressly designed to provide a supportive and collegial presentation environment in which meaningful discussion and constructive feedback is provided to the presenter.

 

Network activities include maintaining the ADR Research Network blog at www.adrresearch.net  on Twitter and conducting annual scholarly round tables of work in progress since 2012.

 

Guest blog post proposals are always welcome. Contact blog editor Dr Becky Batagol, at Becky.Batagol@monash.edu.

 

 

Membership of Australasian Dispute Resolution Research Network

We don’t like hierarchies or unnecessary administration, so we don’t have any membership list or legal organisational framework.

The way to become a member of the ADR Research Network is to subscribe to the blog. This is our primary means of communication.

Subscription will mean that every time a post is made on the blog you will receive a notification alert to your email address. Other ways to follow blog activity is through Facebook “ADR Research Network” and Twitter, but engagement on these platforms is not necessary to keep track of blog activity.

Working Group on International Arbitration and Conciliation/Dispute Settlement – an opportunity to observe

The UNCITRAL National Coordination Committee for Australia (UNCCA) is now able to send a few observers through the international organisation of lawyers’ association LAWASIA, to UNCITRAL Working Group Sessions.

This call is for expressions of interest to attend the upcoming 67th session of Working Group II on Arbitration and Conciliation / Dispute Settlement. The session, at this stage, is tentatively scheduled for 2-6 October 2017, and will be held in Vienna, Austria.

Blick_von_Stephansdom_Nordwesten

By UrLunkwill (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY 2.5 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.5)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Work will focus on legislative development on the enforcement of conciliated settlements in two possible forms; as agreed at the end of the 66th session, “the Working Group would continue to prepare both a model legislative text complementing the Model Law on Conciliation, and a convention, on enforcement of international commercial settlement agreements resulting from conciliation.” (More information on the current work of WGII is available at http://www.uncitral.org/uncitral/en/commission/working_groups/2Arbitration.html)

Academics, researchers, and/or professionals whose current work is connected to that of the Working Group, and who could, accordingly, benefit from observing these sessions, are invited to register their interest in attending with:

Dr Dalma Demeter, Chair of the Expert Advisory Committee for Working Group II at UNCCA.

Please send a current CV and a short paragraph explaining why you would like to attend, and how attending the sessions would contribute to your work, to dalma.demeter@canberra.edu.au

by 15 June 2017.

Please note that there are only limited places available, and neither UNCCA, not LAWASIA are in the position of providing funding.